Research:

Neonatal resuscitation: Effectiveness of Supreme Laryngeal Mask Airway (SLMA) versus Face Mask in preventing need for endo-tracheal intubation

The study concluded that in newborns   . . . the SLMA is more effective than a face mask in preventing the need for endo-tracheal intubation.

This prospective study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a supreme laryngeal mask airway (SLMA) versus face-mask ventilation for preventing the need for endo-tracheal intubation at birth. The SLMA is a medical device used to keep a patient’s airway open.

After a short-term educational training on SLMA use, 142 infants at 34 weeks gestation or above who required positive pressure ventilation (PPV) at birth were randomized equally to resuscitation by SLMA or face mask. The success rate of the resuscitation devices (SLMA or face mask) was defined as the achievement of an effective PPV, thus preventing the need for endo-tracheal intubation.

Successful resuscitation rate was significantly higher with the SLMA compared with face-mask ventilation.  In addition, the neonatal intensive care unit admission rate was significantly lower in the SLMA than in the face-mask group. The study concluded that in newborns with gestational age at 34 weeks or above and/or expected birth weight at or above 3.3 lbs. needing PPV at birth, the SLMA is more effective than a face mask in preventing the need for endo-tracheal intubation. The SLMA is effective in clinical practice after a short-term educational intervention.

Paper:

Supreme Laryngeal Mask Airway versus Face Mask during Neonatal Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Trevisanuto, D, et al.

J Pediatr. 2015 Aug;167(2):286-91.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.04.051. Epub 2015 May 21.