Research:

Review of neonatal resuscitation practices in Vietnam: a national survey

The survey identified significant variations in resuscitation practices between the levels of hospitals and limited adherence to international recommendations.

Identifying ways to improve neonatal resuscitation is critical if we are to reduce mortality in newborns. This study evaluated the consistency of resuscitation practices, and adherence to the international guidelines for neonatal resuscitation, in a large representative sample of hospitals in Vietnam.

A questionnaire was sent to 187 public central, provincial and district hospitals, representing the three levels of public hospital-based maternity services in Vietnam. Together, births in these hospitals represent almost half of all in-patient births in Vietnam. The overall response rate was 85.7% (160/187 hospitals), with a response rate of 100%, 90.3% and 81.7% for central, provincial and district hospitals, respectively. Neonatal resuscitation was provided by obstetricians and/or midwives at all levels.

The survey identified significant variations in resuscitation practices between the levels of hospitals and limited adherence to international recommendations. Half of the hospitals did not follow recommendations for delaying cord clamping. The majority did not have a wall thermometer in the delivery room and did not monitor neonatal temperature after birth. A large proportion of hospitals used 100% oxygen to initiate resuscitation (not the standard of practice) and only central hospitals avoided this practice.

Paper:

Neonatal resuscitation in Vietnam: a national survey of a middle-income country, Trevisanuto, D, et al.

Acta Paediatr. 2015 Jun;104(6):e255-62. doi: 10.1111/apa.12925. Epub 2015 Mar 9.